Here s A Smart Water Pitcher because You re Too Lazy To Change The Filter

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Sonaki inline shower filter
For removing almost all contaminants
Sonaki This activated carbon filter is the most effective choice for your shower head, and since it's an inline model you won't need to buy a separate showerhead. The granular activated carbon removes chlorine, chloramine (another disinfectant sometimes used), heavy metals, rust, and any other byproducts, so you can shower knowing that you're safe. Plus, it'll soften your water so you can get softer hair than ever.

id="cnetReview" section="rvwBody"> For $45, the Wi-Fi-equipped Brita Infinity pitcher promises to keep track of how much water is passing through the filter. Once the filter is about spent, it'll go ahead and automatically order a replacement from Amazon that'll arrive at your doorstep just when you need it.

Even if your water is perfectly safe, your hair and skin might still benefit from a shower filter. For some people, the minerals and metals in their shower water wreaks havoc on their hair. Water with high concentrations of minerals is known as "hard water," and it runs through the pipes in many people's homes. Not sure if you have hard water? This USGS map can help.

A sensor in the bottle tracks every sip you take and records it in your activity app when synced. The Hidrate Spark bottle works with iOS and most Android phones. The lid and bottle are dishwasher safe, and the sensor can be hand washed. The bottle uses replaceable batteries that you can purchase directly from the Hidrate website.  

All of these brands have received multiple customer reviews on Amazon -- the bottles on this list are all in the four-star range with mostly favorable reviews on Amazon (no one can please everyone). From basic bottles to portable pouches to all-day canteens, try replacing your plastic water bottles with one of these reusable models. 

Plastic is lightweight and durable, but can transfer tastes and odors to your beverage. Glass bottles are safer to drink from than plastic and don't hold onto flavors but they're fragile and not ideal for rough outdoor activities like backpacking. Metal water bottles and stainless steel are usually made with insulation and are the best at keeping your beverages cold, but they can be heavy and subject to dents and scratches.

Chris Monroe/CNET Oxo Cold Brew Coffee Maker
A breeze to operate, the $49 Oxo Good Grips Cold Brew Coffee Maker offers an easy way to steep and strain grounds at room temperature. The cold brew the Oxo Good Grips makes is consistently strong, sweet and with deliciously low acidity. To add an additional layer of filtration, Oxo Good Grips bundles paper filters that can aid the brewer's stainless-steel mesh reusable filter. If you want to make hot tea, the Good Grips can also be used as a tea infuser.

It's the perfect collapsible bottle for backpackers, campers and anyone who's tight on storage space. This Platy comes with a screw-on top by default, but you can always pair it with different Platypus soft bottle caps and straws.

Some gadgets even create cold brew in a fraction of the time it usually takes. The $109 Gourmia Cold Brew and $129 Dash Rapid are excellent examples. Both countertop machines complete the process in minutes, not hours.   

Espro Press P5
One tried-and-true cold brew method for making cold brew is to use a French press, with the coffee steeping overnight. One drawback to these simple contraptions though is they tend to have poor filters. The result is often a gritty drink -- solid coffee grounds suspended in a liquid solution, especially if you don't have a coarse grind for your beans. The $60 Espro Press P5 tackles the gritty coffee grounds problem by using two stainless steel mesh filter baskets. The extra level of filtration helps the P5 create cold brew (or hot) that's wonderfully smooth and flavorful. However, the beverage the Espro brews isn't as concentrated as what other products make. Another detractor is the Espro's price. It costs twice as much as an ordinary French press. 

For those on a budget, "espresso brewers" (in the $30 to $50 price range) typically lack motorized pumps and are powered by steam pressure alone. What they produce is really moka pot, the sort of coffee made by simple stovetop brewers; it won't taste quite like the espresso you're used to from the barista at your local coffee shop or cafe. That's not inherently bad -- it's just not really espresso.

Brita's smart pitcher is $20 more than an identical Brita pitcher with no smarts to speak of, so the question here is whether or not that Amazon Dash integration is worth the extra 20 bucks. In theory, it's a useful bit of automation -- especially if you already buy replacement filters on the regular. In practice, it isn't all that precise, and more than anything seems designed to get people to buy new filters more often than they would out of habit alone. It certainly isn't something that anyone needs, but it might make a decent gift for a friend who's picky about filtered water.